Auditory Sensory

sing

Description:

Auditory sensory problems arise due to ears and brain not coordinating fully, there is an interference in how the brain interprets sounds. Learners with auditory sensory problems can usually recognize different sounds but only if they are in a controlled and quiet environment. Some ways in which auditory sensory problems can be seen is if the learner is easily distracted or bothered by loud noises, if their behavior improves in quieter environments, if they have trouble following directions, and if they struggle with following conversations.

Purpose

Auditory sensory activities are important for learners with auditory sensory problems because they can help decrease existing harmful coping mechanisms. It is also important to practice such activities to ensure that learners can become more aware of different sounds and how to differentiate them in loud environments.

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Maracas
Activity 1: Shaking Sounds

Shake a pair of maracas in time with the beat of the song. If this percussion instrument is not available, then bottles filled with dry beans, lentils, rice or pebbles can be used.

Purpose

This activity facilitates rhythm in the learner and also helps to focus and concentrate. This activity is great for working on auditory sensitivity to sounds.

  • Step 1

    Find an empty bottle to fill. Put some dry beans or pebbles in the bottle. (As many as you want, but not the full bottle!)

  • Step 2

    Start shaking the bottle with the pebbles on the beat and rhythm of any preferred song.

  • Step 3

    For an extension have the learner identify the contents through shaking and listening. For example, ask the learner to identify what sound the beans make and how it is different to the sound of the pebbles.

sounds
Activity 2: Listening for Sounds

Identify common sounds in their environment. The learner may close their eyes and listen to environmental noises (i.e., birds, air conditioner, cat purring) or sounds from an audio or video recording (i.e., YouTube).

Purpose

This activity helps improve sensitivity to sound as well as perception of non-speech sounds.

  • Step 1

    Play a variety of sounds one at a time for the learner. Some examples of sounds that can be used include but are not limited to: planes, trains, cars, children playing, birds chirping, and animal noises.

  • Step 2

    Draw a simple picture of each of these sounds OR if the learner is able to read, write the label of the sound. Ask the learner to identify/point to each of these sounds as he hears them one by one. (Place a picture of a dog, a cat, and a phone in front of the learner. Play the sound of a cat’s meow and ask the learner to point to the sound he just heard.)

silence
Activity 3: 100 Seconds of Silence

The learner along with the caregiver will be in a quiet environment

Purpose

This activity helps to develop patience and consciousness in the learner. Also, to improve sensitivity to sound as well as perception of non-speech sounds.

  • Step 1

    Look for a quiet room or location where you can sit for 100 seconds.

  • Step 2

    Sit with the learner for 100 seconds in quiet.

  • Step 3

    If the learner is having difficulty sitting in silence, you may play some light- soothing music and gradually increase the time spent to 100 seconds.

clap
Activity 4: Clapping Syllables

Attending for sound patterns. The learner will imitate the pattern of clapping/tapping which is done by the parent or caregiver.

Purpose

This activity will facilitate auditory attention and auditory memory.

  • Step 1

    Have the learner close their eyes or sit facing away from you. Clap hands, play a drum, bounce a ball, etc.

  • Step 2

    Have the learner imitate your clap pattern (i.e., 1-2 fast, 3-4-5 slow)

  • Step 3

    Have the learner say out loud how many counts there were.

  • Step 4

    For an extension you may pronounce each family member’s name while at the same time clapping it out syllable by syllable.

sounds
Activity 5: Differentiation Sound Frame

The caregiver makes different sounds - made by vehicles, animals and the learner has to detect it.

Purpose

This activity will help the learner to differentiate between similarities and differences when listening to sounds. It helps teach learners to improve listening skills.

This is a continuation of Activity 2: Listening For Sounds

  • Step 1

    Have the learner close their eyes or sit facing away from you. Clap hands, play a drum, bounce a ball, etc.

  • Step 2

    Once the learner has guessed what makes the sounds ask them to repeat it. For example: a vehicle, an animal.

  • Step 3

    Ask the learner to compare two sounds that were made and explain the differences and similarities.

Rhymes
Activity 6: 100 Rhyming Words

Read rhyming words aloud. Supplying words with the same final sound as the stimulus word.

Purpose

This activity is important for reading and spelling. It helps the learner to recognize words that share common sounds and often share common letter sequences. This activity is also useful for developing word recall skills and auditory closure ability.

  • Step 1

    Sit with the learner and explain that you will be rhyming words together for example cat and mat.

  • Step 2

    Do two rhymes as an example for the learner and then have the learner say one or two rhymes.

  • Step 3

    Continue until the learner has done as many rhymes as they can.

  • Step 4

    If this is too challenging for the learner, you may try this finger counting rhyme game. Start counting on your fingers and after each number say a rhyming word (i.e. one-fun, two-shoe, three-knee, etc.)

hum
Activity 7: Whistle or Hum

The caregiver creates a simple set of sounds which has claps, whistles or hums in a pattern.

Purpose

This activity allows the learner to focus and concentrate by making sure the learner is not missing out on the noises that would help them repeat the set of sounds.

  • Step 1

    Start clapping/whistling/humming in a specific pattern. Do 5 whistles/hums and stop. Have the learner repeat the same pattern until they learn it.

  • Step 2

    Do another 5 whistle/hum pattern and have the learner repeat until they learn it.

  • Step 3

    Continue doing this with different patterns.

read
Activity 8: Read out Loud

Read aloud to the learner every day and multiple times in the day.

Purpose

This activity helps the learner train their ears to different sounds, voices and tone.

  • Step 1

    Any reading material around the home can be used for this activity, such as newspapers, magazines, books, pamphlets. Preferably in a language that is frequently used around the learner.

  • Step 2

    Read aloud short pieces to the learner and change your tone, emotion, expression, volume, speed as much as possible.

  • Step 3

    Continue doing this with different tones, emotions, volumes and speed.